Wednesday, October 19, 2005

Northern Peru - the Maranon Endemics



Entry #3



15 September

We woke up at about 4:30 a.m. and got up at 5:00; got dressed and went up to the open air dining table and wrote in our journals until the others arrived for breakfast at 6:00 a.m. We had French toast with maple syrup and learned that the Brits called it "eggie bread" or "Flippin' Angels"! We watched the sun come up over the river. Jose drove us across the river on the suspension bridge at Balsas, just down the road. We waited at the far end of the bridge at a toll booth style bar across the road until a policeman sauntered over to check out our papers. Jose dropped us off at a sign marking our entrance into the District (Peruvian state) of Amazona, and he returned to help the crew break camp. We birded up the road through a mango tree plantation (there were also banana treees). We finally managed to see several Maranon Thrushes - quite a beautiful spot-breasted bird. In the dry thorn forest on the slopes above the mangos we finally saw a flock of the Scarlet-fronted Parakeets that we'd been hearing and continued to see the Maranon Gnatcatchers that frequent this habitat. The bus then picked us up and took us about 3 km up the road into the dry thornscrub on the way out of the Maranon Canyon, where after some extreme efforts we finally saw the Yellow-faced Parrotlets. After strained views from far down canyon, a beautiful pair flew in over our heads from above and landed in a tree top right in front of us! Bill got some fabulous photos. I might have gotten some too, they were so close, but I was so busy watching them that I forgot to get my camera out.

Before we left the spot, Dave and I sprinkled some of the seeds (nonviable ..... we do know better than to introduce exotics!) we'd brought along from Ryan Beaulieu's memorial service. Ryan was a 16-year-old New Mexican birder with incredible potential as an ornithologist who'd been killed in a tragic car accident last month. We knew that he would have loved the trip to Peru and that seeing this beautiful bird would have elicited what had become known as Ryan's "orgasmic birding experiences".

We then got back on the bus and made the long, winding drive up out of the valley toward Abra Barro Negro. This was an extremely narrow, treacherous road that "strikes terror into the hearts of travelers" according to Barry. On occasions the assistant driver and the cooks would get out and check out the road or a plank on a rickety bridge to make sure it was OK to cross with the bus, and on one occasion we all piled out of the bus and walked over an area still partially marred by the contents of a recent landslide. The assistants cleared rocks from the road and directed the bus driver across. I wasn't sure whether we were asked to leave the bus because it made its weight less or because they didn't want us to be in it if it went over the side. I didn't really want to know. Jose is an extremely good driver, very careful and clearly experienced in how the bus will react to bumps and holes in the road, how close he can drive to the rock face on the mountain side of the road and precipice on the other side, and how far he can swing wide around the corners. We are safe because of him.

We ate lunch before reaching the pass - a fabulous chicken salad with green beans, peas, french fries (of course) , etc. I remember this recipe from last trip. We birded a little after lunch and then made the pass - Abra Barro Negro (3500 m) - over and into the Utcubamba River drainage. It was cold, windy and cloudy - we saw several well bundled horse trekkers up there. We birded our way along at several places where the high grasslands of ichu grass were interspersed with remnant cloud forest patches. I got pretty chilled by the time we finally climbed back onto the bus for the 1.5 hour drive down to Leimeibamba (also spelled Leymebamba etc.).

We were staying for 2 nights at the Hotel Laguna de los Condores. I took a much-needed shower - trying to balance the scalding hot and freezing cold water while standing in a shower with a high window (no glass or screen) to the outside. It felt great to be clean. Since we had 2 nights, I did my first washing out of underwear and socks in the sink (hoping that these things would be dry after 2 nights proved to be ill-fated ..... amazing how smelly clean socks can be when you stuff back into the zip-lock bag when they're still slightly damp!). We had listing and dinner right in the hotel - egg drop soup, spaghetti with tomato sauce, and melon with nuts for dessert. Went to bed at 9:30 p.m. after catching up on journaling.

16 September

We got up at 4:15 a.m. and piled onto the bus at 4:45 in the dark to spend the day birding in the Abra Barro Negro area (3100-3400 m). The stars were out when we left and were a predictor of a mostly sunny day. We were going to be birding at high elevation near the pass all day and I noticed that Ivan, one of the assistants, had added a nylon vest to what always seemed to me a thin wardrobe for cold temperatures ... but he was still wearing flip-flops! It turned out that it was breezy much of the day, with some clouds, and with the exception of a few minutes here and there, we were never hot and I didn't regret the light-weight longjohns that I'd worn under my pants. In fact, I was glad for all the layers I'd put on - High-Tech T-shirt (polyester); High-Tech long-sleeved T; High-Tech longjohn bottoms; regular nylon pants; sun shirt; fleece jacket; and field vest with rain jacket substituted at times as a wind-breaker - I only removed a layer late in the afternoon.

We stopped and had breakfast at dawn at a pull off just above our first target species site - Russet-mantled Softtails. Breakfast was more basic this morning - instant coffee, cold cereal and yogurt. We walked down the road after breakfast and were almost instantly successful when a pair of softtails came in to the tape. It certainly is helpful that Barry and the other tour leaders know specifically where some of these species have territories. Although I sometimes joke about not liking the Furnarids because I have such a difficult time telling the canasteros, softtails and spinetails apart, I must admit that these Russet-mantled Softtails were beautiful birds - bright rufous cap, back, wings and longish brushy-looking tail feathers. They flew in repeatedly to give us great looks - a good start to the day since they are not "guaranteed" birds for the trip.

We had planned for a long day because we were staying up there to do a little owling after dark. I was a little concerned about whether I'd hold out, but I think I did OK. The hiking up and down the road went alright and just when I'd decided that I needed to ask Barry to call the bus up so I could rest, he called lunch. Another fabulous lunch - some kind of beef steak with a few carrots and some kind of red (tomato) sauce with mashed potatoes. Anticipating the need to keep up my strength for a long afternoon/evening, I had seconds and so felt a little stuffed for a while walking, but it turned out to be a good idea. We continued birding up the road, looking for 2 special hummingbirds that we all hoped for - Great Sapphirewing and Coppery Metaltail - no luck - it was very windy and there wasn't much bird action along the road. I sat out the last 15 minute foray and grabbed a few winks on the bus. We then drove partway down and stopped to explore a trail that Barry knew. I wasn't sure whether I should go, but I did and even though it involved hiking down a trail (which meant I'd have to come back up on the return), I used my inhaler to prevent my minor asthma (allergies) from kicking in and did better than I expected - a little huffing and puffing but not too bad. Again it was pretty quiet bird-wise but we had one smallish feeding flock of Moustached and Masked Flower-Piercers, Rufous-naped Brush-Finches, Spectacled Whitestart, etc.

Then we returned to the bus to wait for nightfall (or at least dusk). I caught up a little on my bird-listing notes. We then drove back up toward the pass, to a place near a school and house at a bend in the road. While we waited for dusk, I worked on my list and watched a small storm (rain cloud) approaching. It never amounted to more than a steady sprinkle for a short time, but the air cooled down rapidly as the sun disappeared. Several children came down from the house or school and talked with Raul and Jose. Erick took them some candy and got some cute pictures. We managed to see 2 Yungas Pygmy-Owls before darkess fell. Then we walked down the road for quite a while in the full moonlight - the rain had passed quickly - playing tapes for Cinnamon Screech-Owl and Ladder-tailed Nightjar. We had no response from the owl and frustrating responses from nightjars on the tops of ridges or across the valley, but they refused to "play" (they didn't come in). On our last trip, a Ladder-tailed Nightjar came bombing in almost immediately, calling and circling over our heads in the beams of our flashlights. Too bad. We discussed whether the full moonlight might have something to do with it (last trip it was cloudy and raining). I know there have been some publications indicating that certain night birds are not as active in full moonlight because it exposes them to larger night predators (larger owls).

We finally gave up and left the mountain at 7:45 p.m., arriving back in Leymebamba at 8:45. We had dinner almost immediately, made by the cooks from a local restaurant. Apparently they were miffed the previous night when our own cooks prepared our food since they were usually hired to do this; in the interest of good relations for future trips, they were asked to cook the second night. It was very good - pumpkin soup; rice with beef slices, onions, tomatoes and french fries, and flan for dessert.

We are all hoping that Sam will feel better tomorrow. The bug bites on his lower legs are really bad and swollen. During the day today I was horrified when I saw them and worried that they were getting infected. He didn't come down for dinner because he felt so bad, so I got our supply of Cortaid (cortisone cream), Neosporin (antibiotic cream) and Benadryl (antihistamine) and sent them up to his room with Bill. Sam spent much of the trip fighting off allergic reactions and/or infection from these bites. I expect that he "soldiered on" on numberous occasions when the swelling made walking uncomfortable. Apparently he'd never had this kind of reaction to similar chigger-type or jejene bites before. A reminder that both prevention and after-treatment are important to be prepared for. By the end of the trip, I decided that my early concerns about having packed too many medications were unfounded .... a number of them were made available to the group and I felt prepared rather than like a hypochondriac. My opinion .... trips like this offer enough challenges and one does not need to be uncomfortable when a few basic medications can solve the problem.

No list tonight since it's so late; we'll do it tomorrow. We still didn't get to bed until 10:45 p.m.!

Images from the day... (1) An elegant Puna Hawk hovering, completely still, in the wind over a mountain ridge. (2) A farmer walks his 6-8 cows down the road past us and then 30 minutes later he walks them back up again. What was that about? Speculations included .... he has to walk them to improve their milk production .... ???? (3) Full moon playing hide and seek among the clouds as we peered up and down-slope looking for eye-shine or the fluttering long tails of Ladder-tailed Nightjars. (4) A guy walking down the road in the dark with a flashlight. I wonder what he thought when he suddenly came upon a bunch of strange gringos with flashlights in the dark on a Peruvian mountain road? (5) Mountain Caracaras gamboling on the wind and striding purposefully across meadows in search of caracara-type food (whatever that is) (see photo).

Birds Observed from Balsas camp up to and around Abra Barro Negro
September 15-16

Hooded Tinamou (Heard only)
Black Vulture
Turkey Vulture
Bay-winged (Harris') Hawk
Variable (Puna) Hawk
Mountain Caracara
American Kestrel
Andean Lapwing
Band-tailed Pigeon
Peruvian Pigeon
Eared Dove
Croaking Ground-Dove
Bare-faced Ground-Dove
Black-winged Ground-Dove
White-tipped Dove
Scarlet-fronted Parakeet
Yellow-faced Parrotlet (Peruvian Endemic)
Groove-billed Ani
Peruvian Pygmy-Owl (Heard only)
Andean (Yungas) Pygmy-Owl
Lesser Nighthawk
Swallow-tailed Nightjar (Heard only)
Chestnut-collared Swift
White-collared Swift
Spot-throated Hummingbird (Peruvian Endemic)
Andean Emerald
Shining Sunbeam
Mountain Velvetbreast
Great Sapphirewing
Rainbow Starfrontlet
Purple-throated Sunangel
Green-tailed Trainbearer
Purple-backed Thornbill
Tyrian Metaltail
Purple-collared Woodstar
Gray-breasted Mountain-Toucan (Heard only)
Black-necked Woodpecker (Peruvian Endemic)
Andean Flicker
Montane Woodcreeper
Bar-winged Cinclodes
White-chinned (Peruvian) Thistletail (Peruvian Endemic)
Azara's Spinetail
Many-striped Canastero
Russet-mantled Softtail (Peruvian Endemic)
Pearled Treerunner
Rufous-capped Antshrike (Heard only)
Chestnut-crowned Antpitta (Heard only)
Rusty- breasted Antpitta (Heard only)
Blackish Tapaculo (Heard only)
Red-crested Cotinga
Southern Beardless-Tyrannulet
Sierran Elaenia
White-throated Tyrannulet
Tufted Tit-Tyrant
Tawny-crowned Pygmy-Tyrant
Tumbes Pewee (Tumbes Endemic)
Vermilion Flycatcher
Jelski-s Chat-Tyrant
Rufous-breasted Chat-Tyrant
Peruvian Chat-Tyrant
Tropical Kingbird
Inca(Green) Jay
Rufous-browed Peppershrike
Chiguanco Thrush
Great Thrush
Maranon Thrush (Near Endemic)
Long-tailed Mockingbird
Fasciated Wren
Grass (Sedge) Wren
House Wren
Maranon Gnatcatcher (Peruvian Endemic)
Brown-bellied Swallow
Blue-and-White Swallow
Spectacled Whitestart (Redstart)
Citrine Warbler
Black-crested Warbler
Rufous-collared Sparrow
Rufous-naped Brush-Finch
Bananaquit
Cinereous Conebill
Blue-backed Conebill
Black-capped Hemispingus
Superciliaried Hemispingus
Drab Hemispingus
Rufous-chested Tanager
Highland Hepatic Tanager
Blue-gray Tanager
Blue-capped Tanager
Blue-and-yellow Tanager
Hooded Mountain-Tanager
Scarlet-bellied Mountain-Tanager
Buff-breasted Mountain-Tanager
Purple-throated Euphonia
Blue-and-black Tanager
Buff-bridled Inca-Finch (Peruvian Endemic)
Dull-colored Grassquit
Rusty Flower-piercer
Moustached Flower-piercer
Black-throated Flower-piercer
Bluish Flower-piercer
Masked Flower-piercer
Golden-bellied Grosbeak
Streaked Saltator
Mountain Cacique (Heard only)
Yellow-tailed Oriole
Peruvian Meadowlark

17 September

We got up at 5:00 a.m.; packed up; had breakfast at the hotel - omelette with tomatoes, rolls with cream cheese and jam and coffee - at 6:00. We left at 6:35 for 6 hours of driving from Leymebamba along the Utcubamba River Valley - through the towns of Tingo, Churuja, passing just west (5 km) of Chachapoyas and north to Pedro Ruiz Gallo and then on to La Florida or Pomacocha (likely a bastardization of Pumacocha - Puma Lake).

All day in the towns we passed through, I saw poinsettia TREEs, lots of brilliant red and yellow lantana, etc. - house plants growing outside! Observations in the towns - (1) winding out of Leymebamba by circuitous, winding, narrow back streets. It reminded me of my brother Doug's complaint that in Latin America there are no real signs and no straight-through-town routes even if you were traveling through on main roadways. This from his California to Tierra del Fuego motorcycle trip - he was glad for his GPS unit. (2) We saw dogs of every size and description throughout the country - it seemed an indication of sufficient wealth to feed them (?). They weren't the skinny, mangy dogs I was used to in Mexico (at least in the mountains); they appeared well fed. Also there were chickens everywhere - a cheap efficient source of protein - hardy and able to fend for themselves with perhaps minimal supplemental feed. (3) I learned that "bamba" as in Utcubamba, means "flat place".

Just past Tingo, where you can take a turn to go visit some famous ruins, we stopped along the road to look at some ancient Chachapoyan ruins on the steep hillside across the river and up on the cliffs (see photo). They were rounded stone buildings that now appeared built into the hillside due to soil accumulation; they would have had conical grass roofs. While there, we had a small feeding flock move through a large Inga tree covered with white, fluffy flowers and compound leaves.

I noticed regular places along the river where a cable was strung across and a flat trolley of sorts was suspended from it. Apparently people used them to transport supplies from the road across to the farms on the other side of the river.

We drove through some narrow, steep riparian canyons where the entire road was underneath a hewed out rock cliff face overhang; at another spot there was a short tunnel through the rock face. At Churuja we stopped by a stream and birded while lunch was set up. Dan and I tried to photograph an exquisite black butterfly whose under (out) side hind wing was white, the mostly- hidden forewing had signs of scarlet and purple; the in (upper) side of the forewing had a bar of turquoise running from the leading edge, silvery-gray at the trailing edge of the hindwing, and some deeper blue at the base of the wings near the abdomen. It flitted around a lot - hopefully Dan got some shots. Interestingly, some of the ubiquitous little town kids that showed up as soon as we alighted from the bus figured out what we were up to and would point out the butterfly when we lost sight of it as it flitted around.

We stopped in Pedro Ruiz Gallo to gas up the bus and for Raul to buy food supplies. Dave and I explored the market and bought a blanket of the sort we had admired on our beds in the hotel in Leymebamba. We missed finding the others who had ferreted out the nearest bar, and so also missed using the bano. Not being able to access the bathroom at the gas station (locked and no one seemed to have the key), I had to ask to be let out of the bus once we'd left town, and walk up around the bend to pee in a ditch. I guess I was more tired than I thought - having to readjust between high and low, cold and hot climates - because I found this episode to be "just one too many" and took a little while to recover my equanimity.

Along the road we notice large tarps covered with yellow and dark drying coffee beans - I wonder if it's shade or sun grown? People even spread it on the verge of the road with rocks placed at each end of a strip to keep vehicles from driving over it! That, of course, doesn't stop kids or turkeys from walking all over it as I witnessed! Hmmm ..... where does my coffee come from? :)

We drove to a location close to La Florida (also called Pomacochas) to search for the Marvelous Spatuletail (a target species for the trip). Some of us got only unsatisfactory glimpses of a female but spent a lot of time either "bush-whacking" or walking along narrow goat trails across steep, grassy slopes that were truly meant only for goats. During these forays, a little kid showed up and told Barry that he could show us where this hummingbird is regularly seen. According to Barry, there is another kid who does have an uncanny ability to find them. Unfortunately this kid did not have the same talent. He led us to a spot and had us stand there for some time, on the main trail staring at a patch of bushes without even the correct flowers that the spatuletail prefers! We decided that he had a bet with his friends to see how long he could keep a bunch of gringos staring at a bunch of weeds and shrubs. I think he was disappointed because we probably set no records; we soon decided that this was a crock and headed back up the slope. However, Barry consoled us with a description of his "cunning plan" - to have Richard and Rosanne, with the Field Guides group, scout out all the potential sites for Marvelous Spatuletails and we would secure this information and go straight to the most productive site(s).

We finished (gave up) after 5:00 p.m. and drove to La Florida. It is a fairly small town right on the shore of a large lake. We are staying at the famous "ghost hotel", so nicknamed because there is a supposedly real mummy in some kind of traditional case/statue in the lobby. It is rather macabre, especially combined with the paintings all over the hotel hall and in the rooms - an artist(s) who admired/imitated Picasso - one piece that looked like Guernica, and some from his "blue period" - and lots of other genres - paintings of Native people, wierd dream themes, and some quite beautifully done, but rather explicit nudes.

We had another great dinner - tomato soup, chicken curry with rasins and coconut milk over rice, and chocolate pudding. Afterwards I caught up on my journaling and then went to bed. For some reason I'm developing a very stiff/sore left shoulder and neck. I felt it coming on at dinner and tried valiantly to prevent it by stretching in all directions but I was unsuccessful at "cutting it off at the pass". So now I'll have to try aspirin. We left our laundry down at the dining room for washing the next day - we're supposed to be able to pick it up tomorrow evening. I bought a T-shirt with a number of the birds we have or will see at the front desk.

18 September

We got up at 4:00 a.m. and left at 4:30, arriving at Abra Patricia at 5:50 a.m. Abra Patricia is the border line between the Departments of Amazona and San Martin. We birded the road along the pass while breakfast was prepared. We saw some really good feeding flocks in that first hour with quite a few tanagers. We had killer looks at two target species - Lulu's Tody-Tyrant ( a CUTE little beautifully-colored bird) and a pair of Sharpe's Wrens. We were all horrified to hear that some unimaginative, ornithological bean-counter was proposing to rename the Lulu's Tody-Tyrant as the Johnson's Tody-Tyrant. Ned Johnson was the fellow who discovered it, but Johnson had named it after Lulu May Von Hagen for her support of avian genetics research. Lulu's is better by far! Image from that period ... Barry trying to tape some singing bird so as to be able to call it in; looking over his shoulder with a "if looks could kill" glare and shouting up the road to the cooks to "shut up and stop shouting"!; the result - instant silence! Breakfast was pancakes and coffee (see photo of field breakfast set up - whole group except Dave (the photographer) - (left to right) Bill, Erick, Sam, Terry, Barry, Janet, Dan).

We met Roberto Bazan Culqui who works for the organization EcoAn (Ecosistemas Andinos), which gets funding from the American Bird Conservancy for the Abra Patricia project. I took a number of pictures of Roberto with our group and pictures of some of the land (formerly farmed) that has been purchased by the project. Unfortunately they were all lost so I hope someone else took some.

After breakfast we birded a short distance down a trail from the pass that Roberto showed us. Barry quickly gave up because it wasn't well maintained. Later he sent Raul back with a machete to clear the trail so we could return tomorrow. We then birded down the road to a location called "Garcia Ridge". Along this stretch of road we could see some of the land that was purchased by EcoAn with help from ABC to protect it from development. In addition, we had nice looks at a very cooperative and well-named Roadside Hawk (see photo).

Garcia Ridge is the Royal Sunangel target spot. This is where the road ended at the time that LSU (Louisiana State University) first came down here collecting and it is the type location for the Long-whiskered Owlet, which has never been seen outside the net in which one was collected. We had lunch up the road from Garcia Ridge - barbecued chicken and apple salad. We continued birding along the road for a bit and then took the trail that went down from Garcia Ridge. It was extremely muddy, although apparently immensely better than usual because of the lack of rain - Barry claims to have been there up to his knees in the mud on the trail. I was not particularly comfortable traversing this trail, not being a big fan of balancing on slippery logs across mucky, wet areas. I have an uncanny knack for falling into places like this and spend a lot of time thinking about falling in, which undoubtedly inclines one toward self-fulfilling prophecies. But, with a lot of goofy-looking arm-waving by me and arm-lending by Dave, I managed NOT to fall in. It was, however, not a very successful afternoon - I know that Barry was frustrated even though it wasn't his fault. It was very quiet and we didn't hear much; what we did hear was next to impossible to see (furtive shadows flitting through the underbrush). We returned to the ridge for another look for the Royal Sunangel - no luck.

We returned to the hotel at Pomacochas just before dark. My laundry was done but unfortunately Dave's was not, leaving him fairly short on clothes, so he handwashed a few things in the sink. We had another good dinner - vegetable noodle soup in a milk base; steak in tomato sauch with mashed sweet potatoes, and pineapple slices in some kind of juice for dessert. Returned to the room to drape my half-dry laundry all over the room and on the balcony and to bed.

Birds Observed in Utcubamba River Valley, en route to and around Pomacochas, and Abra Patricia area
17-18 September

Torrent Duck
Snowy Egret
Cattle Egret
Black Vulture
Turkey Vulture
Roadside Hawk l
Zone-tailed Hawk
American Kestrel
Bat Falcon
Andean Coot
Spotted Sandpiper
Band-tailed Pigeon
Peruvian Pigeon
Plumbeous Pigeon (heard only)
Eared Dove
White-tipped Dove
Scarlet-fronted Parakeet (heard only)
Red-billed Parrot
Speckle-faced Parrot
Scaly-naped Parrot
Groove-billed Ani
Chestnut-collared Swift
White-collared Swift
White-tipped Swift
Green-fronted Lancebill
White-bellied Hummingbird
Giant Hummingbird
Shining Sunbeam
Collared Inca
Rainbow Starfrontlet
Long-tailed Sylph
Marvelous Spatuletail (Peruvian Endemic)
Purple-collared Woodstar
White-bellied Woodstar
Ringed Kingfisher
Emerald Toucanet
Lafresnaye's Piculet
Tyrannine Woodcreeper
Azara's Spinetail (heard only)
Buff-browed Foliage-gleaner (Heard only)
Variable Antshrike
Rufous-capped Antshrike (Heard only)
Chestnut-crowned Antpitta (Heard only)
Rusty-tinged Antpitta (Peruvian Endemic) (Heard only)
Rufous-vented (Peruvian) Tapaculo (Peruvian Endemic) (Heard only)
Streak-necked Flycatcher
Lulu's Tody-Tyrant
Peruvian Tyrannulet (Peruvian Endemic)
Southern Beardless-Tyrannulet
White-crested Elaenia
Sierran Elaenia
Torrent Tyrannulet
Tawny-crowned Pygmy-Tyrant
Bran-colored Flycatcher
Cinnamon Flycatcher
Cliff Flycatcher
Smoke-colored Pewee
Tumbes Pewee (Tumbes Endemic)
Black Phoebe
Vermilion Flycatcher
Dusky-capped Flycatcher (Heard only)
Tropical Kingbird
Social Flycatcher
Inca (Green) Jay (Heard only)
Chiguanco Thrush
Great Thrush
Maranon Thrush (Near Endemic)
Sharpe's Wren
Maranon (Speckle-breasted) Wren (Heard only)
House Wren
Gray-breasted Wood-Wren (Heard only)
Bar-winged Wood-Wren (Peruvian Endemic) (Heard only)
Maranon Gnatcatcher (Peruvian Endemic)
Blue-and-White Swallow
Black-lored Yellowthroat (Tumbes Endemic)
Spectacled Whitestart (Redstart)
Citrine Warbler
Russet-crowned Warbler (Heard only)
Rufous-collared Sparrow
Rufous-naped Brush-Finch
Common Bush-Tanager
Ash-throated Bush-Tanager
Rufous-chested Tanager
Buff-bellied Tanager (Near Endemic)
Highland Hepatic Tanager
Blue-gray Tanager
Blue-capped Tanager
Yellow-throated Tanager
Purple-throated Euphonia
Golden Tanager
Saffron-crowned Tanager
Flame-faced Tanager
Beryl-spangled Tanager
Blue-and-black Tanager
Silver-backed Tanager
Straw-backed Tanager
Rusty Flower-piercer
White-sided Flower-piercer
Golden-bellied Grosbeak
White-edged Oriole (Tumbes Endemic)
Peruvian Meadowlark

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